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Counselors' Corner

Need to see a school counselor?

 Student Request to See Counselor Form  

(This is NOT a request to see an Academic Advisor)

Counseling Vision Statement

The Capistrano Unified School District School Counseling Program strives to provide opportunities so that every student will acquire the social-emotional, academic, and career skills to reach their fullest educational potential and successfully manage their lives as healthy, responsible, competent, and productive citizens who respect themselves and others.

Guidance Department

Direct Phone Line:

(949) 234-5319

 

Assistant Principal of Guidance

Michael Hatcher

Academic Advisors (by student last names)

Head Academic Advisor: Julietta Arlotti

Melanie Young (A-Deu)

Julietta Arlotti (Dev-H)

Martha Acosta (I-Mic)

Lisa Wada (Mid-Sam)

Linda O'Donovan (San-Z)

School Counselors

Erin McMichael

Jaime Runyan

Registrar

Val DeLeon

Guidance Secretary

Terri Boardman

Guidance Office Clerk

Sharon Ames

SST / 504 Site Coordinators

Erin McMichael (A-Leb)

Jaime Runyan (Lec-Z)

Teach your teenager to be resilient

 

 

From ReachOut.com: All teenagers can benefit from being resilient and the good news is that it can be taught, which is why it’s a great topic for discussion in schools and for parents to endorse at home. 

What is resilience?

‘Resilience’ is an engineering term meaning the force or pressure a structure can withstand before it breaks. For people, it’s the ability to recover from setbacks, adapt well to change, and keep going in the face of adversity.

Why is resilience important for teenagers?

Having resilience reduces the effects of negative or stressful situations on wellbeing. When teenagers develop resilience, they have access to, and know how to apply, skills that help them to cope during challenging times such as exams.

How is resilience displayed?

Teenagers who are resilient have:

  • emotional awareness and the ability to regulate their emotions
  • control over their impulses
  • an optimistic mindset
  • flexible and accurate thinking
  • empathy towards others
  • believe that they can achieve things (self-efficacy)
  • a willingness to seek help when needed.

FOR THE REMAINDER OF THIS ARTICLE, CLICK HERE!

 


 

Test-Taking Tips

No matter what type of test you are about to take there are tips to help you do the best you can. 

Why Are More American Teenagers Than Ever Suffering From Severe Anxiety?

Parents, therapists and schools are struggling to figure out whether helping anxious teenagers means protecting them or pushing them to face their fears.

By Benoit Denizet-Lewis, OCT. 11, 2017

Click Here to Read

Role of the High School Counselor


 

Why High School Counselors?

High school years are full of growth, promise, excitement, frustration, disappointment and hope. It is the time when students begin to discover what the future holds for them. High school counselors have an impact on these years by implementing a comprehensive school counseling program and collaborating with school staff, parents and the community to create a safe and respectful learning environment. High school counselors enhance the learning process and promote academic, career and social/emotional development. High school counseling programs are essential for students to achieve optimal personal growth, acquire positive social skills and values, set informed career goals and realize their full academic potential to become productive, contributing members of the world community.

 

High school counselors hold a master’s degree and required state certification in school counseling. Maintaining certification
includes ongoing professional development to stay current with educational reform and challenges facing today’s students.
Professional association membership enhances the school counselor’s knowledge and effectiveness. Read "The Essential Role of High School Counselors by ASCA (American School Counselor Association).

SEARCHING FOR A JOB?

Scientists Find That Smartphone Addiction Alters Your Brain Chemistry

Many of us find it difficult to go even a few hours without looking at our smartphone or accessing the internet. Now, a new study has found that addiction to these technologies might cause a chemical imbalance in the brain. (Futurism.com)

 


 

 

Nomophobia: fear of being without your smartphone -- affects 40% of the population (Psychology Today)


 

Control your smartphone addiction with these handy apps (The Kansas State Collegian)


 

What Is Digital Citizenship? Teaching Kids to Be Smart & Safe Online

We've all read news stories about the downside of mobile technology and social media: cyberbullying, harassment, stalking, sexting, catfishing, and the list goes on. It's enough to make any parent want to curl up in a ball and never, ever give their child a mobile device. But, in reality, most kids in the U.S. end up with a mobile phone, tablet, or device in their hands at some point during their teen years — because, despite its faults, mobile technology has made it so much easier for teens and parents to get in touch with each other.

Continue Reading

Laura's House OC H.E.A.R.T. Program for Teens

WHAT IS ADOLESCENT DATING ABUSE:

 

Adolescent Dating Abuse is a pattern of behavior used to control and intimidate an adolescent partner. It includes but is not limited to hitting, yelling, threatening, name calling, and any form of emotional or sexual abuse. It can happen to adolescents at any age, no matter their level of education or economic background. Dating violence can also occur in same-sex relationships, friendships, current or former partners.

In Orange County, 1 in 4 adolescents (boys & girls) is in a physically abusive relationship. That means that 1 in 4 of your friends today is being hurt by a partner. Yes, adolescent dating abuse happens to boys too!

Similar to adult domestic violence, adolescent dating violence is about one adolescent using abuse to gain power and control over another in an intimate relationship.

Many adolescents and parents are unaware that adolescent dating abuse is happening.

Statistics show that 81% of parents believe adolescent dating abuse is not an issue or admit they don't know if it’s an issue. -“Women’s Health,” June/July 2004, Family Violence Prevention Fund & Advocates for Youth.

Remember, adolescent dating violence is about a pattern of abuse. The abuse is consistent and constant. It will not begin with a punch, slap, or a kick, it will begin with a word or a "look in the eye."

 

CLICK HERE TO READ MORE ABOUT LAURA'S HOUSE H.E.A.R.T. TEEN AND HEALTHY RELATIONSHIPS PROGRAM

 

Teens: Are You in a Healthy or Abusive Dating Relationship? TAKE THE QUIZ

Kids of Helicopter Parents Are Sputtering Out


 

As parents, our intentions are sound—more than sound: We love our kids fiercely and want only the very best for them. Yet, having succumbed to a combination of safety fears, a college admissions arms race, and perhaps our own needy ego, our sense of what is “best” for our kids is completely out of whack. We don’t want our kids to bonk their heads or have hurt feelings, but we’re willing to take real chances with their mental health? Article by J. Lythcott-Haimes

Who are Tesoro's School Counselors?

Tesoro High School currently has two full-time credentialed professional school counselors on staff, Jaime Runyan and Erin McMichael. Lauren Reid is our Counselor Intern for Spring 2018. Any Tesoro student can see either counselor as they are not assigned by alphabet like they are with academic advisors.

The counselors are available for appointments M-F from 6:30am-3:00pm.

Contact info:

Phone (949) 234-5310

E-mail jlrunyan@capousd.org, ermcmichael@capousd.org.

They are also available via SchoolLoop.

Mrs. Jaime Runyan


 

It has been a pleasure serving as Tesoro's School Counselor since its inaugural year in fall 2001.

I am a graduate of San Clemente High School, in Capistrano Unified.  I went on to receive my Bachelors in Psychology and a minor in Sociology from Purdue University and earned my Masters in Psychology from Pepperdine University. 

I have always made it a priority to work with students and advocate for them.  I worked with Capistrano Unified and Pepperdine University through the Safe Schools Act and have teamed up with the PRYDE program through the Orange County Sheriff Coroners Department and Pepperdine University.  I have worked with all age groups, but high school is where my true passion lies.

I have a wonderful husband and three beautiful children and a mastiff.  :)

I am honored to be a part of the Titan Family.

 

Ms. Erin McMichael


 

Hello Titans! I joined the Tesoro guidance team in 2015. I currently live in Los Angeles (yes, I commute...) but I am a native of Palm Springs. I earned my B.A. degree in Psychology in 2011, my M.S. degree in Counseling (Option in School Counseling) and my California Pupil & Personnel Services Credential in 2015, all from California State University, Northridge. I was a research assistant in the social psychological research lab at Yale University in the summer of 2010. 

My counseling philosophy is that I value and respect each student for their uniqueness and cultural worldviews; I focus on strengths while providing help with academic or personal life challenges. It is my aim to help students help themselves so that they can be successful when navigating their chosen life path. 

My interests and hobbies include spending time with my family and pets, constantly changing my hair color, singing karaoke (I was a Karaoke DJ for 6 years to help pay my college tuition, lol!), reading, collecting bobbleheads (my office is full of them), and I am obsessed with The Hunger Games Trilogy, Lady Gaga, and researching my Celtic genealogy with the hopes of traveling to Scotland soon!

 

Counselor Intern

Mrs. Lauren Reid

Hi, I am Lauren Reid, and I am excited to begin my School Counseling Internship at Tesoro High School.  I grew up in San Diego and worked very hard to put myself through college. After earning my Bachelor’s degree from California State University, Long Beach in Liberal Studies, I worked academically with special education students in the public-school setting, as well as in the non-public setting through Olive Crest.  I then completed a Master of Arts in Marriage and Family Therapy from Hope International University. 

My perspectives about life, transitions, parenthood, education, and health continue to expand and add to the compassion and patience I utilize when collaborating with students, parents, staff and the community. Currently, I am working toward a Pupil Personnel Services Credential in School Counseling, and am looking forward to helping students navigate and be resilient during one of life’s most challenging stages.  I feel privileged to be able to walk alongside individuals as they find their own unique strengths, values and pathways.

My happiest times are spent hanging with my family, doing Zumba, playing with my giant goofball dog and eating Mexican food.

Teen & Family Hotlines

National Hotlines

California Youth Crisis Line (24/7) 1-800-843-5200 

National Runaway Safeline (24/7) 1-800-786-2929

National Suicide Prevention Lifeline (24/7) 1-800-273-8255

SAFE Alternatives (Self-Injury Hotline) (24/7) 1-800-366-8288

Trevor Project (for LGBTQ youth) (24/7) 1-866-488-7386,Text "Trevor" to 1-202-304-1200 (hours vary) or Chat Online 

Teen Line  (hours vary)1-800-852-8336 or Text "TEEN" to 839863

 

Orange County Local Hotlines

OC Domestic Violence Hotline (OC Sherriff's Dept) (24/7) 714-992-1931 

OC Suicide Prevention Crisis Hotline (24/7) 1-877-727-4747

OC Links (OC Dept of Behavioral Health Services) (M-F 8a-6p) 1-855-625-4657

P.F.L.A.G. South OC Chapter (Parents and Friends of LGBTQ persons) 949-677-7840

 

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Non-Discrimination Statement

The Capistrano Unified School District prohibits discrimination, harassment, intimidation, and bullying in all district activities, programs, and employment based upon actual or perceived gender, gender identity, gender expression, race, ethnicity, color, religion, ancestry, nationality, national origin, ethnic group identification, sex, sexual orientation, marital or parental status, pregnancy, age, physical or mental disability or on the basis of a person’s association with a person or group with one or more of these actual or perceived characteristics. Reference: AR 1312.3, BP 1312.3 and BP 5183.

Rich Montgomery, Executive Director, Human Resource Services/Compliance
33122 Valle Road, San Juan Capistrano, CA 92675
(949) 234-9200

Website Disclaimer

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